From May, 2014

Appreciate Your Colleagues

A few weeks ago I attended ASTD’s International Conference and Expo #ASTD2014. After spending a couple of days with other T&D professionals, it reminded me why I’m passionate about T&D. As with any conference, you leave rejuvenated and excited ready to go back and apply what you learned. However, this year’s conference gave me another level of appreciation for my T&D colleagues. Listening to some of the difficulties other T&D professionals are having with management or clients made me feel normal. It was comforting to know that other people are having similar problems.

Some of their stories were so intense I wanted to hug some of my colleagues. The issues they were dealing with weighed on them so heavily they almost burst into tears. I also wanted to hug my colleagues (weather presenters or attendees) that provided solutions to the problems others were having. Watching people sympathize, empathize and provide solutions to other professionals was heart-warming.

As HR professionals (regardless of discipline), we are always talking about management providing recognition to employees. Why not look across the aisle at the person who is doing the same thing you’re doing and say, “Thank You”? Thank you for being so passionate about our profession. Thank you for sharing your experiences, I learned a lot from you. Thank you for the taking time to encourage me. Thank you for sharing your wealth of knowledge with me

We blog and tweet because we’re passionate about our profession. Every Friday, Christopher Demers does his weekly Best Blogs. Christopher highlights other bloggers because he appreciates the good information they provide other HR professionals. In the vein of appreciating other professionals there are several people I’d to thank; Halelly Azulay @HalellyAzulay, Dan Steer @dan_steer, Rory C. Trotter @SomethingDifferentHR, and Christopher Demers @ChristopherinHR. Thank you for spending time with me! Thank you for putting out good content for your colleagues.

I appreciate what you do for our profession. Keep up the good work and keep putting good information out there for the rest of us! Your labor for our profession is not in vain!

If you want to know other ways you can demonstrate appreciation for your colleagues, you can contact me at corjoejen@yahoo.com and http://www.linkedin.com/pub/cornell-jenkins/11/476/897/

Employees or Children

Who needs supervision more employees or children? Children between the ages of one and ten need a babysitter. Due to the lack of boundaries in the workplace managers view themselves as babysitters.

Just like children, employees are a product of their environment. In 2014 what type of environment are managers creating for their employees? When I was in the eighth grade every day in my algebra class was a circus. My teacher didn’t have control of the class. Her lack of control allowed me to sleep 2-3 days a week.

If managers don’t set expectations for their employees’ performance and behavior the employees will do whatever comes to mind. Regardless of age people need boundaries. Setting boundaries is the only way to properly govern the performance and behavior of employees.

Managers, if you need to treat your employees like children then by all means act accordingly. I had a supervisor that said I have no problem treating you all like children. My supervisor set expectations for her employees’ performance and behavior. She constantly communicated those expectations. The repetitiveness of her expectations made it difficult to forget how you were expected to conduct yourself. Managers what message are you communicating to your employees? Are you communicating expectations or mayhem?

Managers have the responsibility to create an environment in which employees can grow professionally. Mayhem creates an unhealthy work environment which produces sub-par performance. A healthy work environment allows employees to reach their potential.

A healthy work environment has boundaries that govern the actions and performance of its employees. People need boundaries and without them mayhem ensues.
If you want to create a healthy work environment I can be reached at:
corjoejen@yahoo.com and
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/cornell-jenkins/11/476/897/

Balance

Christopher talks about work-life balance from a different perspective. For many in the business world the term work-life balance is just a buzzword. When you talk about work-life balance in reference to yourself are you using it as a buzzword or do you really mean it? When I have work-life balance it means I have time to myself (i.e. me time, family time, and time to spend with friends). Having a work-life balance isn’t solely for running errands. What does work-life balance look like in your life?

If you want to discuss work-life balance in further detail you can contact me at corjoejen@yahoo.com and http://www.linkedin.com/pub/cornell-jenkins/11/476/897/

ChristopherinHR

How do you tip the scales?

Like many other things in American business the discussion around worklife balance has now fully migrated from curiosity to debate to fad to branding bullshit to old news. We don’t talk about it anymore. Like employer of choice its an antiquated phrase that connotes the speaker (or, ahem, writer) is not current.

Too bad: the concept deserves a place in our day to day business considerations.

What is Balance

Thinking of balance like a set of scales probably isn’t the most helpful notion. This view implies that things should be relatively equal (e.g., balanced) and also connotes only two parts to our being: “work” and “other” on either side.

Life is more complex than that.

What if we thought of balance like a river with ebbs and flows, eddies and currents sometimes rushing headlong and sometimes pausing just to feel the sunshine?

Thinking of…

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